Astrophysicists spotted Jupiter's identical twin 17,000 lightyears away

Interestingly, scientists used giant physicist Albert Einstein’s Theory of Relativity to discover the exoplanet

Scientists have discovered that the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter, has an almost identical twin some 17,000 lightyears away.  The twin but distant planet has been named K2-2016-BLG-0005Lb.

The exoplanet is found to orbit its star at a similar distance from its star as Jupiter is from the Sun. The study was published on ArXiv.org and submitted to the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Interestingly, scientists used giant physicist Albert Einstein’s Theory of Relativity to spot the exoplanet.

“This discovery was made using a space telescope that was not designed for microlensing observations and, in many ways, is highly sub-optimal for such science," the scientists, led by Ph.D. student David Specht from the University of Manchester, wrote in the paper. “Nonetheless, it has yielded a direct planet-mass measurement of high precision, largely thanks to uninterrupted high observing cadence that is facilitated by observing from space."

India Scanner News Network

Leave a comment